If we don't talk about
HIV/AIDS in our
community, who will?
Guiding Principles

The work of ACCHO is guided by the belief that:

  • HIV infection among African, Caribbean and Black people is an urgent issue that requires immediate attention and dedication of resources towards prevention of HIV transmission and towards the care, treatment and support of those living with and affected by HIV/AIDS.
  • Efforts to address HIV among African, Caribbean and Black people requires consultation and collaboration with community members and with service providers working with and within these communities.
  • Community-based responses to HIV/AIDS among African, Caribbean and Black communities call for acknowledgement of the diversity within and between African, Caribbean and Black communities across Ontario. This diversity includes, but is not limited to national origin, language, culture, religion, immigration status, area of residence, gender, age, class and sexual orientation.
  • Programs and services for African, Caribbean and Black people should involve them in decision-making roles; be culturally competent; and be accessible and relevant to all African, Caribbean and Black people including children and youth, women, gay men, lesbians, bisexual men and women, transgender men and women, heterosexuals and people who use injection drugs.
  • HIV programming needs to work within a broad social framework that addresses the determinants of health, and systemic issues such as racism, homophobia, and gender inequity.
  • Research with African, Caribbean and Black communities should address community needs, and must be respectful and ethical.